Tag: Arctic

Prof. Jim White: Sea level rise and the melting of sea ice and glaciers (TWO of TWO)

Dr. Jim White turns his attention to ice. The accelerated melting of the Arctic sea ice and the ice caps of Greenland and Antarctica.
Concentrations of carbon dioxide – after water vapor the most important greenhouse gas – are measured in parts per million. The organization 350 dot org expresses in its name that – to be safe from catastrophic climate change – we should not go over 350 ppm of CO2 in the atmosphere. However in late 2016 the measurements at Mauna Loa, Hawaii, went over 400 ppm for the first time in modern history. (And on March 9, 2017 the reading was 405 ppm)
When a visionary scientist, Charles Keeling, began daily readings for CO2 concentration from Mauna Loa in [ . . . ]

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How does the melting Arctic affect the rest of the world?

30 second Preview/Promo click HERE

NOAA’s Arctic Report Card 2016
ONE self contained 29 min. program
The Arctic is now warming twice as fast as the global average. That’s the finding in the 11th Arctic Report Card released on December 13, 2016, at the annual American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco. NOAA’s Arctic Research Program Director, Jeremy Mathis, said about the year 2016: “Rarely have we seen the Arctic show a clearer, stronger or more pronounced signal of persistent warming and its cascading effects on the environment than this year.”
The Arctic Report Card, by a team of 61 scientists from 11 nations, lists the many ways in which the warming Arctic affects sea level rise, ocean and air circulation as well as weather in the [ . . . ]

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How does the melting Arctic affect the rest of the world?

NOAA’s Arctic Report Card 2016
The Arctic is now warming twice as fast as the global average. That’s the finding in the 11th Arctic Report Card released on December 13, 2016, at the annual American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco. NOAA’s Arctic Research Program Director, Jeremy Mathis, said about the year 2016: “Rarely have we seen the Arctic show a clearer, stronger or more pronounced signal of persistent warming and its cascading effects on the environment than this year.”
The Arctic Report Card, by a team of 61 scientists from 11 nations, lists the many ways in which the warming Arctic affects sea level rise, ocean and air circulation as well as weather in the Northern Hemisphere and beyond.
The warming Arctic [ . . . ]

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Arctic Amplification, Climate Change, and Global Warming – New Challenges from the Top of the World (TWO of TWO)

Professor Peter Wadhams
Fossil fuel emissions caused the melting of Arctic ice. Now the Arctic in turn is accelerating global warming instead of cooling the planet because the disappearance or thinning of the ice sheet in the Arctic summer has many serious consequences.
This ice sheet covered the top of the world and touched the coast lines of Greenland, Canada, Alaska and Siberia for 100.000 years. In only 30 years the retreat from the coast lines during the Arctic summer accelerated and an ice free Arctic in September may occur by 2020. And the Arctic winter is no longer cold enough to restore ice levels.
In this extraordinary comprehensive lecture that Prof. Wadhams gave in Milano, Italy, in May 2025, he lists seven [ . . . ]

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Arctic Amplification, Climate Change, and Global Warming – New Challenges from the Top of the World

30 second Preview/Promo of Part ONE click HERE
30 second Preview/Promo of Part TWO click HERE

Professor Peter Wadhams
With increasing urgency Wadhams is calling attention to the disappearing sea ice of the Arctic. In his most recent book, A Farewell to Ice, he writes: “Our planet has changed color. Today, from space, the top of the world in the northern summer looks blue instead of white. We have created an ocean where there was once an ice sheet.”
In a lecture in Milan, Italy, in May 2015, Peter Wadhams explained how the melting of the Arctic affects the rest of the world. He listed seven major areas, among them sea level rise, emission of methane, and extreme weather events that we already experience.
Peter Wadhams is the UK’s most experienced sea ice scientist. He has made more than [ . . . ]

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Arctic Amplification, Climate Change, and Global Warming – New Challenges from the Top of the World (ONE of TWO)

Professor Peter Wadhams
NOTE: This program begins with two brief news clips from NBC4 and Thom Hartmann as reminder that a most important but underreported news item for September is the status of the sea ice in the Arctic.
With increasing urgency Wadhams is calling attention to the disappearing sea ice of the Arctic. In his most recent book, A Farewell to Ice, he writes: “Our planet has changed color. Today, from space, the top of the world in the northern summer looks blue instead of white. We have created an ocean where there was once an ice sheet.”
In a lecture in Milan, Italy, in May 2015, Peter Wadhams explained how the melting of the Arctic affects the rest of the world. [ . . . ]

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Melting Arctic Sea Ice

with Cambridge Glaciology Professor Peter Wadhams (Part TWO of TWO)

Only days before professor Wadhams set off on his 2015 research voyage to the Arctic the UK blogger Nick Breeze did an interview with him, asking him about the latest data on the disappearing Arctic sea ice.
At the end of September 2015 we had just heard on the news that the sea ice minimum at the end of the Arctic summer was the fourth lowest on record. It stands at about half of the ice that used to cover the same area.
Peter Wadhams is Professor of Ocean Physics at the University of Cambridge, UK. With over 40 years of research on Arctic sea ice, icebergs and polar oceanography, he is considered [ . . . ]

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Our Time is Running Out – The Arctic Sea Ice is Going!

with Cambridge Glaciology Professor Peter Wadhams (Part ONE of TWO)
Peter Wadhams is Professor of Ocean Physics at the University of Cambridge, UK. With over 40 years of research on Arctic sea ice, icebergs and polar oceanography, he is considered one of the leading experts in his field.
Recently Wadhams has gone public on an additional danger related to the loss of sea ice. The Arctic summer ends in September and observations show a tendency of shrinking ice followed by a dramatic lack of re-growth of ice during the subsequent Arctic winter. Wadhams has made studies from submarines that show that the new ice is thin and slushy and easily broken up by winds. An ice free Arctic in September would accelerate [ . . . ]

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